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10 Tips Every New Mom Needs

New mom? Here are 10 helpful nuggets of wisdom from our advisors and other Parents insiders that are sure to come in handy.



1. Be ready for sick days. Stock up on rehydration drinks like Pedialyte, Gatorade, or Vitamin Water so you don’t have to run to the store in the middle of the night when your little one is vomiting. —Wendy Hunter, M.D., Rady Children’s Hospital, University of California, San Diego


2. Know your kid. Each child is a unique combination of strengths and challenges. Try to tailor your response to fit the kid in front of you. —Eileen Kennedy-Moore, Ph.D., author of Smart Parenting for Smart Kids


3. Find your crew. Identify the people you can call when you need to vent—friends who’ll give their opinion when you ask for it and keep their mouth shut when you don’t, and who would drop anything to be there for you and your family (and vice versa). Love them hard and thank them often. —Lacey Dunkin, single mom of six


4. Remember you’re a role model. Make being a mom look appealing to your kid so she’ll want to have children and you can be a grandparent one day. If you’re always stressed, pouty, or fussing, she won’t be inspired to become a parent herself. —Wendy Mogel, Ph.D., author of The Blessing of a Skinned Knee


5. Let your partner take over. He’s all in, so encourage him to be in charge of bathing, reading, or tummy time (or all three). They’re great bonding activities—and an opportunity for you to take a breather. —David L. Hill, M.D., author of Dad to Dad: Parenting Like a Pro


6. Talk about money decisions. When you buy a brand of cheese because it’s less expensive (and just as good) or opt to pass on a purse you like “until it’s on sale,” explain your thinking to your kid. —Farnoosh Torabi, mom of two and host of the So Money podcast


7. Read to your child every single day. It helps build imagination and is time well spent. —Christine Hohlbaum, mom of two and author of The Power of Slow


8. Go small with big changes. Bottle to sippy cup? Crib to bed? Of course you want these transitions to go smoothly and quickly, but that can be overwhelming to your little one. Let him play with the new cup, or sit and read together in the new bed first. Once he’s used to the new sensory experiences, you can make the switch official. —Harold S. Koplewicz, M.D., president of the Child Mind Institute


9. Help your baby fall asleep on her own. Feed her at the start of your bedtime routine. After a bath, books, and cuddling, put her down while she’s drowsy but still awake. If you feed or rock her to sleep, she’ll always need your help to nod off. —Dr. Mindell


10. Establish chores. Have your kids pitch in at home by emptying trash cans, making their bed, setting the table, and putting toys away. Helping out with the household tasks builds self-esteem because you trust them to do the job. —Martin R. Eichelberger, M.D., Safe Kids Worldwide, Children’s National Medical Center

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